Books for Faculty

Books for Faculty

The following titles are available for faculty lending. These titles are made available to faculty through the Title 3 grant, and by the Director of Teaching and Learning. Contact Martin Springborg for lending information.

HIGH IMPACT PRACTICES IN ONLINE EDUCATION
EDITED BY KATHRYN E. LINDER AND CHRYSANTHEMUM MATTISON HAYES

High-Impact Practices in Online Education Book CoverA primary goal of High-Impact Practices Online is to share the ways in which HIPs may need to be amended to meet the needs of online learners. Through specific examples and practical suggestions in each chapter, readers are introduced to concrete strategies for transitioning HIPs to the online environment that can be utilized across a range of disciplines and institution types. Each chapter of High-Impact Practices Online also references the most recent and relevant literature on each HIP so that readers are brought up to date on what makes online HIPs successful.

The book provides guidance on how best to implement HIPs to increase retention and completion for online learners.

MEANINGFUL GRADING: A GUIDE FOR FACULTY IN THE ARTS
NATASHA HAUGNES, HOAG HOLMGREN, AND MARTIN SPRINGBORG

Meaningful Grading Book CoverMeaningful Grading: A Guide for Faculty in the Arts enables faculty to create and implement effective assessment methodologies—research based and field tested—in traditional and online classrooms. In doing so, the book reveals how the daunting challenges of grading in the arts can be turned into opportunities for deeper student learning, increased student engagement, and an enlivened pedagogy.

Minding Bodies: How Physical Space, Sensation, and Movement Affect Learning
Susan Hrach

Minding Bodies draws from a wide range of body/mind research in cognitive psychology, kinesiology, and phenomenology to bring a holistic perspective to teaching and learning. The embodied learning approaches described by Susan Hrach are inclusive, low-tech, low-cost strategies that deepen the development of disciplinary knowledge and skills. Campus change-makers will also find recommendations for supporting a transformational mission through an attention to students’ embodied learning experiences.

Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education
Thomas J. Tobin and Kristen T. Behling

Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone is aimed at faculty members, faculty-service staff, disability support providers, student-service staff, campus leaders, and graduate students who want to strengthen the engagement, interaction, and performance of all college students. It includes resources for readers who want to become UDL experts and advocates: real-world case studies, active-learning techniques, UDL coaching skills, micro- and macro-level UDL-adoption guidance, and use-them-now resources.

Skim, Dive, Surface: Teaching Digital Reading
Jenae Cohn

Placing research from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, learning science, and composition in dialogue with insight from the scholarship of teaching and learning, Jenae Cohn shows how teachers can better frame, scaffold, and implement effective digital reading assignments. She positions digital reading as part of a cluster of literacies that students should develop in order to communicate effectively in a digital environment.

The Spark of Learning: Energizing the Classroom with the Science of Emotion
Sarah Rose Cavanagh

In friendly, readable prose, Sarah Rose Cavanagh argues that if you as an educator want to capture your students’ attention, harness their working memory, bolster their long-term retention, and enhance their motivation, you should consider the emotional impact of your teaching style and course design. To make this argument, she brings to bear a wide range of evidence from the study of education, psychology, and neuroscience, and she provides practical examples of successful classroom activities from a variety of disciplines in secondary and higher education.

Teaching the Literature Survey Course: New Strategies for College Faculty
Gwynn Dujardin, James M. Lang, and John A. Staunton

From mapping early English literature to a team-based approach to the American survey, and from multimedia galleries to a “blank syllabus,” contributors propose alternatives to the traditional emphasis on lectures and breadth of coverage. The volume is at once a set of practical suggestions for working teachers (including sample documents like worksheets and syllabi) and a provocative engagement with the question of what introductory courses can and should be.

Transparent Design in Higher Education Teaching and Leadership
Edited by Mary-Ann Winkelmes, Allison Boye and Suzanne Tapp

Transparent Design Book CoverThis book offers a comprehensive guide to the Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT) framework that has convincingly demonstrated that implementation increases retention and improved outcomes for all students. Its premise is simple: to make learning processes explicit and equitably accessible for all students.

 

Intentional Tech: Principles to Guide the Use of Educational Technology in College Teaching
Derek Bruff

Chalkboards and projectors are familiar tools for most college faculty, but when new technologies become available, instructors aren’t always sure how to integrate them into their teaching in meaningful ways. For faculty interested in supporting student learning, determining what’s possible and what’s useful can be challenging in the changing landscape of technology.Arguing that teaching and learning goals should drive instructors’ technology use, not the other way around, Intentional Tech explores seven research-based principles for matching technology to pedagogy. Through stories of instructors who creatively and effectively use educational technology, author Derek Bruff approaches technology not by asking “How to?” but by posing a more fundamental question: “Why?”